Questions? Call us now at 609-688-0428

It’s Time for a Plan!

by Trilogy Partners on Jun 05, 2018 10:04:50 AM

Companies large and small often deliberate on the need and/or depth for a strategic plan or roadmap. Is there really any reason not to have a formal plan documenting where you are; where you want to go; and how you will get there?

At Trilogy Partners, we guide business owners through the strategic planning process, allowing the organizational leadership to get out of the day-to-day and look at the business from “the clouds” or using the cliché, “working on the business, not in the business.” There is an essential difference between tactics, operational effectiveness, and strategy and we have seen first-hand how strategic planning improves overall organizational performance.

In the past, strategic plans were onerous to develop and often sat on a shelf; dusted off only when the plan was requested by a significant stakeholder. Today, the plans are living documents with magnitude and direction. Although plans are specific to each organization, here are 4 initial steps to consider:

  1. Who should participate in the process? Develop a preparation timeline with accountability.
  2. What are your core values? These are your current values, not the values you aspire to be.
  3. Is your vision or mission clearly defined? The vision is an aspirational description of what the organization would like to achieve in the mid or long-term future. It’s a guide for selecting courses of action. The mission statement defines the organization’s core purpose and overall direction. The vision is the cause or pursuit and the mission is the means to achieve the cause. Many companies are combining the vision and mission into one statement.
  4. Do you understand your Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT)? A SWOT analysis is a powerful tool to learn more about your business, people, and many other factors.

These four points create the foundation from which your plan will develop.

So, what does this look like? I worked a company on the 4 steps outlined above and from this, we identified that that growth required an investment in their people and their facilities. One year later, they have hired the right people, expanded their facility and have seen an increase in revenue and a moderate increase in profits. They are encouraged and expect that both revenue and profits will continue to grow.

Trilogy doesn’t only help you develop your plan, but we work with you to ensure that it is put into action. It’s energizing to see the results when a roadmap is not just an exercise but rather, a guiding tool that provides focus, unlocks potential and brings about necessary change. With a roadmap in place, purpose is understood, and it is easier to make critical decisions, differentiate your business, and create a more sustainable organization with higher levels of employee engagement.

So, is it time for your plan? For help with strategy and ensuring that everyone on your team is moving in the same direction, call us at 609-688-0428 or email results@gettrilogypartners.com.

 

 

A Business Case for Courage

by Trilogy Partners on Feb 01, 2018 9:11:13 AM

Business growth is directed through strategy.  This should not be news. Most business leaders have varying levels of implementation around strategy, but most agree that something has to be done with forethought and purpose.  But what really fuels this? At Trilogy Partners, we believe that COURAGE leads to passion that inspires growth.

In August 2015, Forbes published an article (A Measure of Courage) highlighting the American Courage Index.  The article outlined business-related questions geared towards courage, as well as those questions that spoke to the social, moral and emotional aspects of courage.  Not surprisingly perhaps, the results showed that business owners are more courageous than the rest of the US population.  And further, emotional courage increases with age.  Conceptually, these outcomes make sense and jive with many of our personal experiences in the business community.

However, not everyone who works for us is a business owner or of a certain age.  What do we do about measuring and developing courage in those folks?

Courage is a difficult trait to measure.  How do we measure fortitude or fearlessness?  What about bravery or gumption?  The metrics for those should be high in those leading organizations through advancement and change.  But how do we know who has it and who doesn’t?

The arc for this type of measurement is best found in situational and behavioral study.  Measuring based upon a range of responsiveness will serve to illuminate those innate skills and aptitudes.  Survey questions are fine as step one in the process, but it should not serve as the final marker.  Those questions should challenge people to face scenarios.  Those situations should force the responder to make a choice; refrain from the “middle of the road” options as much as possible.  By doing so, we can uncover the heart behind the answer.

To reveal the emotional understanding takes conversation.  These surveys ought to foster conversation.  “What did you pick and why?” is a great opening question.  And while this may seem overly simplistic, it is valuable to the natural responsiveness needed.  It won’t be manufactured if the question is open-ended and completely based upon personal action and opinion.  People like to share what they are thinking, by and large.  And having had a written survey already done gives the employee a heads-up as to what will be reviewed.

As a commodity, courage is something to cultivate.  It’s part of the fabric that organizations often are lacking. We’re such a fear-encouraging culture – retaliation, over-compliance, bad press – that we tend to stay in our lanes and avoid risk.  That fear cripples an organization’s growth.  We are even afraid to dream.

It is a business necessity to foster courage and at Trilogy, we tackle the behavioral dynamics that often hold businesses back. We believe competitive advantages are often born out of fearlessness, risk and passion.  It takes courage to walk such a path, and it takes a courageous company to light that path.

Ready to promote and cultivate courage in your organization? Contact us at results@gettrilogypartners.com or 609-688-0428.

Shut Up and Lead!

by Trilogy Partners on May 31, 2017 9:38:36 AM

Have you ever thought, this would be a great place to work if we didn’t have any employees? Truthfully, it has crossed my mind on a few occasions over the years. How can any leader have such thoughts about our most valuable assets? The answer is simple, we shouldn’t. John Maxwell states “a leader is one who knows the way; goes the way; and shows the way.” Effective leaders will model the expected behaviors through actions, not words, leading to the concept of “shut up and lead.”

During the early 1990’s, Zenger-Miller published The Basic Principles for Success. Since then, I have adapted these principles as the foundation for professional relationships and the paradigm for expected organizational behavior. The principles are truly basic in concept but often difficult to achieve. They require faithful modeling from the highest level within the organization for success.

Principle 1: Focus on the work process, issue, or behavior, NOT the person. It’s human nature to make things personal in the workplace but this automatically brings emotion into the equation. Principle 1 will drive an objective approach allowing for better problem solving and decision making. My observation is that Principle 1 is more difficult in closely-held and family businesses however the results are often more powerful when practiced consistently.

Principle 2: Maintain the self-confidence and self-esteem of others. Leave sarcasm at the door! It is the greatest form of aggression in the workplace and highly demotivating. Contributing fully and risk taking is easier in a climate of trust and acceptance.

Principle 3: Maintain strong partnerships with your internal and external customers. Everyone knows how they want to be treated as a customer. Think about the potential if every employee within the organization was a customer of each other. How about other strategic partnerships and connections? The possibilities are endless for constructive and effective relationships.

Principle 4: Take the initiative to improve work processes and partnerships. Don’t only take the initiative, encourage others to do the same. Acknowledge and respond to all initiatives so your employees know that you welcome ideas and feedback.

Principle 5: Hold yourself and others accountable for commitments. Make sure there are identified positive and constructive consequences and be consistent in all interactions.

Principle 6: Lead by example. Employees want you to “know,” “go,” and “show” the way through your actions, not words. Leaders have much to gain when they can model the needed actions and attitudes to deal with the demands of business and relationships.

Effective leaders strive to practice The Basic Principles in their daily interactions. I have found that adhering to these principles will allow you to “shut up and lead” more confidently and with greater optimism to achieve your desired results.

If you are interested in implementing these principles to create an atmosphere of trust, cooperation, and positive action, contact Trilogy’s Alliance Partner Bill Ehrhardt at (609) 688-0428 or at behrhardt@gettrilogypartners.com.

Providing Feedback Effectively Can Help Your Team Members Grow

by Trilogy Partners on Feb 03, 2016 2:21:08 PM

No one likes to hear what they’re doing wrong.  And, as leaders, we often don’t want to tell employees ‘bad news’ about their progress or attitude.  Yet it is essential that we give open and honest feedback to help our people grow.

A very effective approach is to offer ‘redirecting feedback,’ which seeks to change, or redirect, the recipient’s undesired behavior.  If delivered well, redirecting feedback can be a positive and empowering experience for both the giver and receiver.

Here are seven tried-and-true steps to giving effective redirecting feedback:

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The Employee-Motivation Checklist

by Trilogy Partners on Dec 28, 2015 2:59:58 PM

Through many years of research, trial and error, and working with companies of all sizes in numerous industries, I have identified 16 critical ways to motivate your employees. Learn these techniques and adapt as many as possible in your business.

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