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Seize the Moment: Recognizing how Initiative can Grow your Organization

by Marc Celentana, PhD on Jun 30, 2017 2:05:29 PM

“Initiative is doing the right thing without being told.” – Victor Hugo

Who in your organization has the requisite initiative associated with high performance?  Do any of your employees and colleagues seem to lack initiative?

If either of these questions resonate at some level, it may be time to identify and develop leaders that can create the organization you envision.  Often, tension is associated with ensuring that we have the right people, on the right projects, at the right time.  Failure to properly attend to one or more of these variables can render even the most well-intentioned effort a money loser, morale crusher, or worse, a death knell for the organization.

When you have high performing, motivated employees engaged in meaningful, transformational projects, those who are holding the company back are clearly recognizable. Simply stated, cultivating the strengths and talents of those who demonstrate high initiative is the best insurance for sustainable organizational success.

The descriptors of high and low initiative are provided below so that you may begin to assess those in your organization on this important construct.

High initiative

Seeks responsibility above and beyond the expected
Will go the extra mile to help others
Strives to add value in all that they do
Follows through on tasks with consistency and tenacity
Appreciates the need to take reasonable risks

Low initiative

Requires considerable specific direction
Frequently adopts a “not my job” attitude
Prone to reacting to situations rather than anticipating them
Fails to persevere when faced with challenges
Postpones decision making and misses opportunities

In his book, How to Be a Star at Work: 9 Breakthrough Strategies You Need to Succeed, author Robert Kelley suggests that taking initiative involves more expansive thinking than going after ideas that make you more productive at your own job. It is a desire and willingness to move beyond a job description to reach a goal that benefits the team. Kelley asserts that an individual can be evaluated for performance on any given project by the following five standards:

  1. Doing the job well.
  2. Ensuring that others benefit from their efforts.
  3. Understanding how the project pleases customers and clients while proving profitable to the organization.
  4. Developing focus on increasingly high-level efforts.
  5. Appreciating the potential payoff in light of risks and costs.

Taking on more responsibility, active problem solving, taking risk and adding value are behaviors we want to promote and develop. If you want to learn more about how leveraging initiative can advance your most important projects and your organization, please contact Trilogy Alliance Partner Marc Celentana at (609) 688-0428 or mcelentana@gettrilogypartners.com

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